Browse "Parks & Nature Reserves"

Displaying 46-60 of 91 results
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Notikewin Provincial Park

Interest from local residents led to the establishment of Notikewin Provincial Park (established 1979, 97 km2). Here is preserved a small piece of the quintessential natural landscape of northern Alberta, the once endless poplar and spruce forests deeply dissected by moody rivers.

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Nunavik

Nunavik, the portion of land within the province of Quebec located north of the 55th parallel, covers approximately 500,000 km2 (representing more than one-third of Quebec’s territory). For approximately 4,000 years, Indigenous people have inhabited Nunavik, including Inuit who have made the region their homeland. Today, over 13,000 people live in Nunavik’s 14 villages spread along the Ungava Bay, Hudson Strait and Eastern Hudson Bay coasts.

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Parc national de la Gaspésie

In the heart of the ​Gaspé Peninsula​, 196 km east of Rimouski, is Parc national de la Gaspésie (established 1981, 802 km2). First established in 1937 by means of special legislation, the park has in the past bowed to mining and forestry pressures. It is now completely protected through the park's Act.

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Petroglyphs Provincial Park

Petroglyphs Petroglyphs Provincial Park is the site of one of Canada's archaeological and cultural treasures. On a flat expanse of rock are some 900 carvings or PETROGLYPHS of symbolic shapes and figures, likely carved by Algonquian-speaking people.

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Point Pelee National Park

Point Pelee National Park (established 1918) is a protected area at the tip of Point Pelee, a long peninsula extending into the western end of Lake Erie, south of Leamington, Ontario. Middle Island — Canada’s southernmost piece of land located southwest of Point Pelee — was added to the park in 2000. At 15 km2, Point Pelee National Park is Canada’s second smallest national park. It’s also the southernmost tip of Canada’s mainland, located further south than northern California.

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Prince Albert National Park

Natural Heritage Bounded to the south by farmland, the park lies on a transition zone between 2 ecoregions. Pockets of aspen parkland and fescue prairie in the south of the park blend with mixed-wood and boreal forests in the park's northern reaches.

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Provincial Parks

This image of Reesor Lake in Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park depicts mixed spruce, aspen woodland and fescue grassland (photo by Cliff Wallis, courtesy Cottonwood Consultants Ltd.).Typical boreal shield country in northern Ontario (photo by Brian Milne/First Light).PreviousNext Parks, Provincial Provincial parks are areas of land and water, large or small, natural or man-modified, designated by any of the provincial governments for the purposes of nature protection, recreation, TOURISM, historic preservation and education. They range in...

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Pukaskwa National Park

Pukaskwa National Park (designated 1978, 1877.8 km2) is bracketed on the west by the coastline of Lake Superior, an impressive stretch of massive headlands and beaches of golden sand or water-worn cobble. The name is of native origin but its meaning is unclear.

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Qausuittuq National Park

Qausuittuq National Park encompasses 11,000 km2 on northern Bathurst Island and smaller surrounding islands in Nunavut. It also includes the waters of May Inlet and Young Inlet. Pronounced Kow-soo-ee-took, the name of this park translates to “the place where the sun doesn’t rise” in Inuktitut. It is bordered to the south by Polar Bear Pass National Wildlife Area, and together these two zones protect a large, ecologically intact area in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Qausuittuq was established on 1 September 2015 as Canada’s 45th national park. It represents the Western High Arctic Natural Region, the 38th natural region of the 39 that constitute Canada’s national parks system.