New Brunswick | The Canadian Encyclopedia

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  • Timelines

    Acadians

    This timeline highlights events and people related to Acadian History.

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  • Article

    Atlantic Provinces

    Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Newfoundland constitute the Atlantic provinces.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/Categories_Placeholders/Dreamstime/dreamstimeextralarge_93681941163.jpg Atlantic Provinces
  • Collection

    Acadian Heritage

    This collection explores the rich heritage of the Acadians through articles and exhibits, as well as quizzes on arts and culture, history and politics, historical figures, and places associated with the Acadian people.

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  • Article

    Intergenerational Trauma and Residential Schools

    Historical trauma occurs when trauma caused by historical oppression is passed down through generations. For more than 100 years, the Canadian government supported residential school programs that isolated Indigenous children from their families and communities (see Residential Schools in Canada). Under the guise of educating and preparing Indigenous children for their participation in Canadian society, the federal government and other administrators of the residential school system committed what has since been described as an act of cultural genocide. As generations of students left these institutions, they returned to their home communities without the knowledge, skills or tools to cope in either world. The impacts of their institutionalization in residential school continue to be felt by subsequent generations. This is called intergenerational trauma.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/Categories_Placeholders/Dreamstime/dreamstimeextralarge_1035738016.jpg Intergenerational Trauma and Residential Schools
  • Article

    Maritime Provinces

    The word Maritimes is a regional designation for the Canadian provinces of Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. These provinces constitute a cluster of peninsulas and islands that form the northeastern extension of the Appalachian Highlands and are also significantly affected by the Atlantic Ocean. Together, the Maritime provinces cover 133,850 km2 — or just a little more than 1 per cent of Canada's land surface.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/media/276c48ba-ecfb-4c4a-aec6-e7bba279abf9.jpg Maritime Provinces
  • Article

    New Brunswick

    New Brunswick is one of three provinces collectively known as the "Maritimes." Joined to Nova Scotia by the narrow Chignecto Isthmus and separated from Prince Edward Island by the Northumberland Strait, New Brunswick forms the land bridge linking this region to continental North America. It is bounded in the north by Quebec and in the west by the US (Maine). In 1784, the British divided Nova Scotia at the Chignecto Isthmus, naming the west and north portion New Brunswick after the German duchy of Brunswick-Lunenburg. New Brunswick is now the only officially bilingual province in Canada.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/media/0ad6e160-c61e-4c22-b4ad-5db332fb3e11.jpg New Brunswick
  • Article

    Resistance and Residential Schools

    Residential schools were government-sponsored religious schools that many Indigenous children were forced to attend. They were established to assimilate Indigenous children into Euro-Canadian culture. Indigenous parents and children did not simply accept the residential-school system. Indigenous peoples fought against – and engaged with – the state, schools and other key players in the system. For the duration of the residential-school era, parents acted in the best interests of their children and communities. The children responded in ways that would allow them to survive.

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