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Amos

Founded in 1914, Amos became in the mid-1920s the most important town in Abitibi and the county town of this newly settled region of Québec. It took its name from Alice Amos, the wife of Sir Lomer Gouin, premier of Québec.

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Amqui

Amqui's municipal history is more complex than it seems. In 1907, the village centre had split away from the parish municipality of Saint-Benoît-Joseph-Labre. It adopted the name Amqui in 1948 and was given town status in 1961.

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Amund Ringnes Island

Amund Ringnes Island, 5255 km2, located between Ellef Ringnes and Axel Heiberg islands in the Arctic Archipelago. It is flat (highest point about 610 m) and windswept; in winter its coasts are virtually indistinguishable from the surrounding ice.

Editorial

Vancouver Feature: Doors Open into an Exotic Cave

To find sophisticated entertainment in old Vancouver you had to go underground, into a grotto where stalactites hung from the ceiling and pirate’s gold shimmered in darkly lit corners. The Cave Supper Club hosted the world’s most famous entertainers and beautiful showgirls for 44 years. It was the rare place in subdued Vancouver to go out on a weekend evening for some risqué entertainment and exotic drinks.

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Ancaster

Ancaster, Ont, Urban Community within the city of Hamilton. Ancaster was incorporated as a town in 1974, but in 2001 it was merged into the new city of Hamilton

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Trails and Greenways

Today, Canadians in increasing numbers are participating in trail related activities spurring the growth of trails all across the country for hiking, walking and cycling.

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Fury and Hecla Strait

Fury and Hecla Strait is located at the northern end of Foxe Basin, connecting the basin with the Gulf of Boothia, and separating Melville Peninsula on the mainland and Baffin Island to the north.

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D-Day and the Battle of Normandy

The 1944 Battle of Normandy — from the D-Day landings on 6 June through to the encirclement of the German army at Falaise on 21 August — was one of the pivotal events of the Second World War and the scene of some of Canada's greatest feats of arms. Canadian sailors, soldiers and airmen played a critical role in the Allied invasion of Normandy, also called Operation Overlord, beginning the bloody campaign to liberate Western Europe from Nazi occupation. Nearly 150,000 Allied troops landed or parachuted into the invasion area on D-Day, including 14,000 Canadians at Juno Beach. The Royal Canadian Navy contributed 110 ships and 10,000 sailors and the RCAF contributed 15 fighter and fighter-bomber squadrons to the assault. Total Allied casualties on D-Day reached more than 10,000, including 1,074 Canadians, of whom 359 were killed. By the end of the Battle of Normandy, the Allies had suffered 209,000 casualties, including more than 18,700 Canadians. Over 5,000 Canadian soldiers died.

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Art Galleries and Museums

 Art galleries and museums are institutions that collect, preserve, study and present permanent collections of heritage objects to the public. According to the Canadian Museums Association, there are currently over 2300 museums and related institutions in Canada.