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Article

Skunk

 The skunk is a carnivorous, cat-sized mammal. Skunks were previously considered as part of the weasel family (Mustelidae) but DNA research has placed them in their own family, Mephitidae.

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Squid

Squid are decapods ("10-footed") molluscs of class Cephalopoda. Squid are usually of the order Teuthoidea).

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Scorpionfish

Scorpionfish, or rockfish (Scorpaenidae), family of bottom-dwelling, marine fishes with large heads, mouths and eyes, stout bodies and large pectoral fins.

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Mackerel

Mackerel (Scombridae), family of pelagic (open-sea) fishes of class Actinopterygii. The family also includes tunas, albacores, skipjacks, bonitos and ceras.

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Perch

Although perch is the common name for several distantly related species of fish, it properly refers to members of the perch family (Percidae), order Perciformes, class Actinoperygii.

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Herring

Herring, common name for fish of the widely distributed family Clupeidae.

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Dogs in Canada

Dog (Canis familiaris) is a carnivorous mammal, and probably the first domesticated animal. In Canada, dogs were first kept by Indigenous peoples. The Canadian Kennel Club recognizes 187 breeds, five of which are uniquely Canadian: the Tahltan bear dog, the Canadian Inuit dog, the Nova Scotia duck-tolling retriever, the Newfoundland dog and the Labrador retriever. A sixth dog breed indigenous to Canada, the Salish woolly dog, went extinct before the Canadian Kennel Club officially registered it as a breed.

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National Parks of Canada

Canada’s national parks are protected areas established under federal legislation to preserve Canada’s natural heritage. They are administered by Parks Canada, a government agency that evolved from the world’s first national parks service, the Dominion Parks Branch, established in 1911. The National Parks System Plan, developed in 1970, divided Canada into 39 natural regions and set the goal of representing each region with at least one national park. Canada now has 48 national parks and national park reserves in 30 of these regions. In total, the parks cover more than 340,000 km2, which is over 3 per cent of Canada’s landmass. They protect important land and marine habitats, geographical features and sites of cultural significance. National parks also benefit local economies and the tourism industry in Canada.

(This is the full-length entry about National Parks of Canada. For a plain-language summary, please see National Parks of Canada (Plain-Language Summary).)