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St Boniface

St. Boniface, Manitoba, incorporated as a town in 1883 and a city in 1908, now one of 15 wards in the city of Winnipeg, population 46,035 (2016 census). St. Boniface is located on the banks of the Red and Seine rivers in eastern Winnipeg. One councillor represents St. Boniface on Winnipeg City Council. As one of the larger French communities outside Quebec, it has often been at the centre of struggles to preserve French language and identity within Manitoba.

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Deux-Montagnes

The area was first developed for summer cottages. Later, its proximity to Montréal turned this locality into a residential suburb. Tourism and agriculture, once the mainstays of the local economy, have almost disappeared.

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Hudson

This wealthy residential suburb of Montréal is proud of its stately homes, and its residents also highly value a great variety of sports and cultural activities. The town's economy lacks an industrial base.

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Great Slave Lake

Great Slave Lake is located in the Northwest Territories. It is the second largest lake entirely within Canadian borders, the fifth largest in North America, and the tenth largest in the world.

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Reserves in Nova Scotia

There are 42 reserves in Nova Scotia, held by 13 First Nations (see First Nations in Nova Scotia). Nova Scotia is one of just two provinces, the other being Prince Edward Island, that is part of the traditional territory of only one Indigenous people. In both cases, it is the Mi'kmaq. In 2020, there were 17,895 registered Mi’kmaq in Nova Scotia, about 63 per cent of whom (11,202 people) lived on reserve. Reserves in Nova Scotia vary in size from over 3,500 hectares to less than one, though almost every First Nation has more than one land tract.

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Greenfield Park

The site of Greenfield Park was part of the Seigneury of Longueuil. The area remained primarily agricultural until the mid-19th century, when railway development began to encourage the growth of the towns and villages around the city of MONTRÉAL.

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Montréal-Est

Montréal-Est owes its existence to Joseph Versailles, an important Montréal broker. In 1909 he bought 6 km2 of land in order to create a quiet and peaceful residential community. Heavy industry developed around the port and the community evolved away from Versailles's original vision.

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Grande-Île

This rural municipality has become a residential suburb of Valleyfield and of Greater Montréal. Its population nearly doubled from 1981 to 1996. Even though manufacturing and construction industries play a major role in the local economy, agriculture is still prominent.

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Saint-Charles-Borromée

Saint-Charles-Borromée was at one time an agricultural village but is now almost totally residential. It is a suburb of Montréal and Joliette. There is no industrial zone, so economic activity is almost exclusively commercial. The hospital is the largest employer.

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Esquimalt

Esquimalt, BC, incorporated as a district municipality in 1912, population 16 209 (2011c), 16 840 (2006c). The Township of Esquimalt is located on the southern tip of VANCOUVER ISLAND adjacent to VICTORIA.

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Fort McMurray

Fort McMurray, Alberta, unincorporated population centre, population 61,374 (2011c), 47,705 (2006c). Fort McMurray is the largest community in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo (RMWB). It is technically known as the municipality’s “Urban Service Area” and colloquially known as “Fort Mac.” The community located near the confluence of the Athabasca and Clearwater rivers in northeastern Alberta, near the centre of the vast Athabasca oil sands deposit. Originally incorporated as a city in 1980, in 1995 Fort McMurray merged with much of the surrounding area — collectively known as Improvement District No. 143 — to create the RMWB. At 63,783 km2, the municipality is the largest in North America in terms of size, accounting for nearly 10 per cent of the province’s total area. In May 2016, Fort McMurray experienced one of the worst forest fires in Canadian history. More than 80,000 residents were evacuated and approximately 2,400 structures — about 10 per cent of the city — were destroyed.

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Mascouche

The history of Mascouche was closely linked to the roles played by Gabriel Christie and Peter and his son John Pangman, 3 of the last owners of the Seigneury de La Chesnaye.

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Masson-Angers

Masson-Angers is both industrial and residential in character. The main employer is the James MacLaren Industries pulp and paper mill, dating back to 1932. Hundreds of residents also work as civil servants for the federal government, commuting daily to and from the Ottawa-Hull area.

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Heritage Trail

Hundreds of trails are now found from coast to coast in Canada, installed and run by national and provincial parks, the Canadian Wildlife Service, tourist departments, conservation authorities, museums, universities, schools, botanical gardens and private agencies.

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Otterburn Park

The name Otterburn is a reminder of the birthplace of Sir Joseph Hickson, general manager of the GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY from 1874 to 1890.

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View Royal

View Royal, BC, incorporated as a town in 1988, population 9381 (2011c), 8768 (2006c). The Town of View Royal is located on the Esquimalt Peninsula, five kilometres west of the city of VICTORIA and bordering on Esquimalt Harbour.