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Encyclopedia of Music in Canada

The Encyclopedia of Music in Canada was the first music encyclopedia published in Canada. It comprises more than 3,100 articles and 500 illustrations. It includes biographies of Canadian musicians and histories of music organizations in Canada. Topics that are covered include Inuit music, piano building, awards, education, instrument collections, folk music, the music scenes in Canadian cities and Canada's musical relations with other national cultures. Bibliographies, discographies and lists of compositions are included. Because of its role in documenting Canada's musical history, the EMC is a standard reference work for schools, libraries and musicians.

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Chamber Players of Toronto

The Chamber Players of Toronto. A 15-piece string ensemble, formed in 1968 by the players themselves and directed until 1977 from the first chair by the violinist Victor Martin (b Elne, France, of Spanish parents, 24 Sep 1940; a pupil of Antonio Arias, Lorand Fenyves, and Max Rostal).

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Waterloo Music Company Ltd.

Waterloo Music Company Ltd. Publishing and instrument retailing firm founded in 1921 by Charles F. Thiele in Waterloo, Ont. Thiele was sole owner until 1951, when Waterloo Music became a limited company with Thiele as president (1951-4; followed by R.P.

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Accordion

Accordion. Portable free-reed bellows-operated instrument patented in Austria in 1829 by Cyril Demian.

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Acadian Music

​Music and song have always been an important part of Acadian culture. Music education has existed in Acadia since the 1860s. School and college choirs have enjoyed great success, and classically trained Acadian musicians have distinguished themselves on the world stage.

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Chamber Music Performance

Chamber music performance. Early evidence of the cultivation of classical chamber music in Canada, mainly by amateur performers, both as an edifying leisure activity and in public concerts, dates from the period 1790-1820.

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Indian Music in Canada

In 1986 in Canada there were approximately 280,000 people of Asian Indian origin, the majority of whom had arrived after 1968. Earlier immigrants from India were mostly Sikh labourers who arrived ca 1905-8 from the Punjab.

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World Soundscape Project

World Soundscape Project. Founded by R. Murray Schafer in the late 1960s with headquarters at Simon Fraser University. This research group has secured Canada a place in the forefront of the study of soundscape ecology.

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Dutch Music in Canada

The first Dutch immigrants to Canada arrived via the USA during the late-18th and early-19th centuries as part of the United Empire Loyalist contingent. By 1867 there were 29,000 persons of Dutch origin; in 1986 there were more than 850,000, many of whom arrived soon after World War II.

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“O Canada”

“O Canada” is Canada’s national anthem. Originally called “Chant national,” it was written in Québec City by Sir Adolphe-Basile Routhier (words in French) and composer Calixa Lavallée (music), and first performed there on 24 June 1880. It began to be sung widely in French Canada at that time and later spread across Canada in various English-language versions, of which the best-known was written by Robert Stanley Weir in 1908. The lyrics of this version were amended several times over the years, with the most recent changes occurring in February 2018; the French lyrics have been shortened but otherwise remain unaltered from the original. “O Canada” was approved as Canada’s national anthem by a Special Joint Committee of the Senate and House of Commons on 15 March 1967. It was officially adopted as Canada’s national anthem under the National Anthem Act on 27 June 1980. The Act was proclaimed by Governor General Edward Schreyer in a public ceremony on Parliament Hill on 1 July 1980.

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CBC recordings

CBC recordings. In 1945, in Montréal, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation produced its first music recordings intended for broadcast abroad and in Canada.

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Harp

The harp is prized as much for its expressive range and gentle textures as for its elegant appearance. The instrument is heard not only in the performance of classical music, but has increasingly become an integral part of Celtic and folk music performances in Canada and elsewhere.

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Hedley (band)

Pop-punk band Hedley shot to stardom in 2005 after lead singer Jacob Hoggard finished third on Canadian Idol in 2004. The band won two Juno Awards rom more than 30 nominations, sold nearly 1 million albums and 4 million singles, and had a record 16 videos hit No. 1 on the MuchMusic Countdown chart. In 2014, Billboard called Hedley Canada’s “king of all-format airplay.” In February 2018, the band was blacklisted from Canadian radio following multiple allegations of sexual assault against the band members dating to 2005. Hoggard was arrested and charged with sexual interference and two counts of sexual assault in July 2018. In 2022, he was found guilty of sexual assault causing bodily harm and was sentenced to five years in prison.

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Brass

Besides fulfilling traditional military and ceremonial functions, brass instruments have accompanied services in churches, played a pioneer role in the development of ensemble playing, participated in orchestral performances, and simply displayed their own gleaming brand of virtuosity.

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Folklore

Folklore was first introduced as a term in England in 1846 and today refers to information, wisdom and human expression that is passed on, usually anonymously, from generation to generation or transmitted and circulated as traditional cultural behaviour.