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Music in Guelph

Guelph, Ont. Founded 1827 by John Galt in the heart of agricultural Ontario and incorporated in 1879. In 1846 there were 1240 people living in Guelph. By 1988 the population had reached 80,786 including a large Italian.community.

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Music at Brandon University

When the Dept of Music was founded in 1906, it offered only conservatory-type instruction under the direction of Abbie Helmer Vining (1906-7). W.L. Wright, afterfour years' study in Berlin with Leopold Godowsky, took over in 1907 and remained director until 1947.

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Music in Peterborough

Ontario city on the Otonabee River (part of the Trent-Severn Waterway). It was settled ca 1820 by County Cork Irish, was named Peterborough in 1827, and was incorporated in 1905. It developed into a lumbering and milling town.

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Music at McGill University

McGill University. Founded in Montreal in 1821 as the University of McGill College. McGill University is the chief English-language university in the province of Quebec and houses one of Canada's most established music programs.

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Music in Hamilton

City on Lake Ontario with a natural bay as harbour. Taking its name from George H. Hamilton (1787-1835), who laid it out in 1813, the town was incorporated as a city in 1846 when, with a population of 10,000, it was the second-largest city in Upper Canada.

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Music in Laval

City to the north of Montreal bounded by l'île Jésus. Until 1854 the tilling of the soil was done within the framework of the seigneurial system.

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Music in Moncton

New Brunswick city originally known as LeCoude and first settled in 1750 by Acadians. The Acadians were dispersed in 1758 but returned in sufficient numbers to constitute a fundamental segment of the Moncton community.

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Music in Kingston

City at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, founded by Frontenac as Fort Cataraqui in 1673 and later renamed Fort Frontenac. It was captured by the British in 1758 and named Kingston in 1783 by Loyalists fleeing from New York.

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Music in Stratford

Ontario town (Little Thames until 1831) located on the Avon River 75 kilometres west of Hamilton, in Perth County, and incorporated as a city in 1885. It was the site of railway shops ca. 1871-1964 and became the home of the Stratford Festival in 1953.

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Music in Windsor

Southern Ontario city across the Detroit River from Detroit, Mich. First settled in 1834, it was established as the western terminus of the Great Western Railway in 1854 and was incorporated as a town in 1858 and as a city in 1892.

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Little Burgundy and Montreal's Black English-Speaking Community

Little Burgundy is a neighbourhood in the southwest borough of Montreal, Quebec. It is the historical home of the city’s Black English-speaking, working-class community (see also Black Canadians). Montreal's early Black settlement was comprised mainly of African Americans who lived in the Faubourg (French for "suburb") of St. Antoine — a neighbourhood that is now known as Little Burgundy. The settlement dates to the emergence of the railway companies in the mid- to late 19th century and the era of the Black sleeping car porters.

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Music in Saskatoon

Saskatchewan city founded in 1882 as a temperance colony by pioneers from Ontario. It was incorporated as a town, with a population of 544, in 1903, and as a city, with five times that number, in 1906.

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Music in Ottawa

Canada's capital city, situated in Ontario on the Ottawa River. Settled in the early 1800s, it was called Bellows' Landing (1810), Richmond Landing (1811), and Bytown (1826) after Col John By, who, 1826-32, supervised the building of the Rideau Canal.

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Music in London

Ontario city situated halfway between Toronto and Windsor on the Thames River. It was laid out in 1826, incorporated as a town in 1846 (population 3500), and as a city in 1855.

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Art Galleries and Museums

 Art galleries and museums are institutions that collect, preserve, study and present permanent collections of heritage objects to the public. According to the Canadian Museums Association, there are currently over 2300 museums and related institutions in Canada.

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Music in Toronto

For much of Toronto’s early history, the dominant cultural force in the predominantly Protestant enclave was church music. By the beginning of the 20th century, Toronto was known as “the choral capital of North America.” By that time, the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra were well established. The city has also been an epicentre of piano building, music publishing, and the English-language recording and broadcasting industries. In addition to classical and choral music, Toronto has been a national centre for jazz artists, folk musicians, rock ‘n’ roll bands and R&B and hip hop artists. The city is home to the headquarters of many major record labels and cultural institutions, as well as some of the country’s oldest and best-known concert halls.

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Music at Community Colleges

Community colleges. Post-secondary, non-university educational institutions in English-speaking Canada (for Quebec, see Cegeps). Community colleges do not generally grant degrees, although many offer university transfer credit, and most confer diplomas.

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Music in St John's

The capital city of Newfoundland and Labrador, situated on the northeastern arm of the Avalon peninsula. St John's claims to be the oldest settled and continuously occupied European community in North America.