Search for "residential schools"

Displaying 1-15 of 15 results
Article

Outremont

Outremont, one of the smallest cities in terms of area of the MONTRÉAL Urban Community (MUC), is one of the most affluent, beautiful and picturesque residential communities on the island.

Article

Griffintown

Griffintown was developed in the 19th century as a working-class Irish neighbourhood of Montréal. It underwent several attempts at urban revitalization from the 1980s onwards. Since 2010, there have been a number of controversial real estate developments in the neighbourhood.

The neighbourhood is part of the Sud-Ouest and Ville-Marie boroughs of Montréal. It is located along the Lachine Canal, between Notre-Dame, McGill and Guy streets.

Article

Deux-Montagnes

The area was first developed for summer cottages. Later, its proximity to Montréal turned this locality into a residential suburb. Tourism and agriculture, once the mainstays of the local economy, have almost disappeared.

Article

Hudson

This wealthy residential suburb of Montréal is proud of its stately homes, and its residents also highly value a great variety of sports and cultural activities. The town's economy lacks an industrial base.

Article

Grande-Île

This rural municipality has become a residential suburb of Valleyfield and of Greater Montréal. Its population nearly doubled from 1981 to 1996. Even though manufacturing and construction industries play a major role in the local economy, agriculture is still prominent.

Article

Vancouver Chinatown

Vancouver's Chinatown features a distinctive hybrid of architectural styles that combines Chinese regional architecture with locally established Western motifs. The main streets in Chinatown follow a traditional Western grid pattern, while the north side is distinguished by interior courtyards, alleyways and façades that face both lanes and streets.

Article

Valley East

Valley East was formed by the amalgamation of 3 agricultural and rural townships: Hanmer (founded in 1904), Capreol and Blezard (both founded in 1906). Capreol was annexed to Hanmer in 1967 and Hanmer and Blezard amalgamated in 1969 to form the township of Valley East.

Article

Trois-Rivières-Ouest

The history of Trois-Rivières-Ouest is linked with that of the city of Trois-Rivières. Set up as a parish municipality in 1855, it remained rural and semi-rural in character for many years, its population quite small in comparison with that of its neighbour.

Article

Pierrefonds

Pierrefonds dates back to the founding of the parish of Sainte-Geneviève in 1741. Its boundaries have since been broken up into 3 municipalities: ROXBORO (1914), DOLLARD-DES-ORMEAUX (1924) and Pierrefonds.

Article

Stoney Creek

The first European settlers, primarily LOYALISTS, arrived from the US in 1786. The area was cleared for mixed farming and Stoney Creek attracted many saw and grain mills and other agricultural service activities.

Article

Pointe-au-Père

In 1663, the Jesuit priest Henri Nouvel landed on the south bank of the St Lawrence River and conducted the first mass. In 1696 this territory was the seigneurie de Lessard, granted to Pierre Lessard and Barbe Fortin, his wife.

Article

The Forks

The Forks is a public space where the Red and Assiniboine rivers meet in the heart of what is now the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba. It occupies the waterfront zone east of Main Street and south of the CN mainline rail bridge. The Forks has played a complex role in the history of the region and of Canada as a whole. It has been a traditional gathering place for thousands of years and was an important hub of the fur trade in the 18th and 19th centuries. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, many immigrants stopped at the Forks on their journey west. It was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1974 and is home to other sites of historical and archeological significance, as well as museums, monuments, parks and theatres.

Article

Old Montreal

Old Montreal is the historic district of the city of Montreal, located in the south-central part of Montreal Island and bounded by the St. Lawrence River to the south, Saint-Antoine Street to the north, McGill Street to the west and Saint-Hubert Street to the east. In the second half of the 20th century, this area came under pressure from urban change, as business and port activity shifted elsewhere, depriving Old Montreal of its historic roles. But in the 1960s, a long process began that completely transformed it into a heritage district (it was at this time that the name Old Montreal came into common use). The designation of the Arrondissement historique de Montréal by the Quebec government in 1964 marked an important step in this transformation. With massive investments from the three levels of government, as well as from businesses and individuals, a lengthy rehabilitation effort began. Nearly 60 years later, visitors can now follow the traces of Montreal’s history back to pre-colonial times, and the changes that the city has undergone since the first European settlers arrived in 1642.