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Montmorency

The Montmorency Manoir, built in 1781 by Frederick HALDIMAND, governor general in chief of Canada, was inhabited 1791-94 by the duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria. First known as the "Kent House," it suffered a devastating fire in 1993 but was rebuilt by the following year.

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Habitat 67

Habitat 67 is an experimental urban residential complex designed by Israeli-born architect Moshe Safdie and located in the Cité du Havre neighbourhood south of Montréal’s Old Port sector. Commissioned by the Canadian Corporation for Expo 67, the project derives its name from the theme of the fair, “Man and His World,” and became one of the major pavilions of the exhibition. It is the only remaining structure from Expo 67 to retain its original function. In 2015, the Guardian called Habitat “a functioning icon of 1960s utopianism, and one of that period’s most important buildings.”

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Canadian Broadcasting Centre

The Canadian Broadcasting Centre was developed as the result of a proposal call process in which the Cadillac Fairview Corporation Limited was selected to develop the 9.3 acre site, owned by the CBC, and build the centre, which was then leased to the CBC on a long-term basis.

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Basilica of St John the Baptist

Visible from everywhere in St. John's, Newfoundland, and, so important in the 19th century, the most striking building as one entered the harbour, the Basilica of St. John the Baptist was built to assert the place and power of Newfoundland's Irish Catholic population.

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Canadian Centre for Architecture

The Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) is both a museum of architecture and a research institute. It is located in Shaughnessy Village, a neighbourhood in downtown Montreal. Internationally renowned, the CCA is the primary Canadian institute devoted to the study of architecture. It was founded in 1979 by architect Phyllis Lambert to raise public awareness of the importance of architecture in society and to encourage innovation and university research regarding architecture.

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Green Thumb Theatre

Foon wrote Heracles, about Greek heroes; Raft Baby, a l9th-century tale from the BC interior; and The Windigo, from an Ojibwa myth. Shadowdance, written by Sheldon Rosen and directed by Yurek Bogajewicz, was an innovation in children's theatre and provided a frightening glimpse of a medieval world.

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Château Ramezay

​Château Ramezay, in Old Montréal, was the first building to be designated a historic monument by the government of Québec, in 1929.

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Government Building

Government has always been the most important patron of ARCHITECTURE in Canada, and this role has increased rapidly over the past few decades. As its duties and responsibilities expand, so do its building needs. Today all levels of government contribute to all aspects of our built environment.

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Skyscrapers

A skyscraper, simply put, is a building of well-above-average height with useable storeys and a self-supporting skeleton structure. There is no fixed height at which buildings qualify, but those less than about 40 metres (130 feet) or 10 storeys have historically not been considered skyscrapers.