Search for "residential schools"

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Maisie Hurley

Maisie Hurley, née Maisie Amy Campbell-Johnston, Vancouver-area political activist, Indigenous ally (see Indigenous Peoples in Canada), newspaper founder and art collector (born 27 November 1887 in Swansea, Wales; died 3 October 1964 in North Vancouver, British Columbia). Although Hurley had no formal legal training or law degree (see Legal Education), she worked on several legal cases and advocated for Indigenous peoples’ basic human rights as well as for changes to the Indian Act. In 1946, Hurley started a newspaper called The Native Voice that aimed to bring attention to important issues concerning Indigenous communities across Canada (see Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Canada). In 2011, Hurley’s collection of Indigenous art was displayed at the North Vancouver Museum.

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Music at Western University

The Faculty of Music at Western University (known legally as the University of Western Ontario) offers a full range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Located in London, Ontario, it is one of the largest music schools in Canada.

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Toronto College of Music

Toronto College of Music. One of three music schools to open in Toronto during the 1880s - the others being the TCM(RCMT) and the Metropolitan School of Music. The college was founded in 1888 by F.H. Torrington and by 1890 had 400 students and a faculty of about 50.

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Habitat 67

Habitat 67 is an experimental urban residential complex designed by Israeli-born architect Moshe Safdie and located in the Cité du Havre neighbourhood south of Montréal’s Old Port sector. Commissioned by the Canadian Corporation for Expo 67, the project derives its name from the theme of the fair, “Man and His World,” and became one of the major pavilions of the exhibition. It is the only remaining structure from Expo 67 to retain its original function. In 2015, the Guardian called Habitat “a functioning icon of 1960s utopianism, and one of that period’s most important buildings.”

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Music in Sorel

City situated 60 km east of Montreal at the junction of the St Lawrence and Richelieu rivers on the former site of Fort Richelieu, built in 1642, and the seigneury given in 1672 to Pierre de Saurel, a captain in the Carignan-Salières Regiment.

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Music in Brantford

Brantford, Ont. Ontario settlement established in 1805 on the Grand River. It was named in 1827 in honour of the Mohawk chief Joseph Brant, and incorporated as a city in 1877. The population, under 10,000 in 1867, had increased to over 66,000 by 1975.

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Banff Centre for the Arts

Banff Centre for the Arts (Banff School of Fine Arts, 1933-89). In 1991 one of three divisions of the Banff Centre for Continuing Education, so named in 1978 when the Alberta Legislature proclaimed the Banff Act establishing the Banff School of Fine Arts as an autonomous institution.

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Music in Charlottetown

The capital of Canada's smallest province, Prince Edward Island. Established by 300 French colonists as Port-la-Joie in 1720, it was renamed Charlottetown in 1768 and was incorporated as a town in 1855 and as a city in 1875.

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Music in New Westminster

City east of Vancouver near the mouth of the Fraser River. After its designation (1859, incorporation 1860) as the capital city of British Columbia it was named New Westminster by Queen Victoria, and hence nicknamed 'The Royal City.

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Music in Lethbridge

Alberta's third largest city, settled about 1870 and incorporated as a town in 1891 and as a city in 1906. It was named after William Lethbridge (1824-1901), first president of North Western Coal and Navigation Co.

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Music in Sherbrooke

City in southern Quebec, located about as far south of Quebec City as it is east of Montreal. With its suburbs it has a population reaching about 129,000 (1990); it has been called 'Queen of the Eastern Townships' or of 'L'Estrie,' the more recent name for the area.