Browse "Archeological sites"

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Agawa Pictograph Site

 The cliff is on a big rock of white crystalline granite, which contrasts with the red paintings although mineral traces, lichens and graffiti have damaged them in some places.

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Áísínai’pi (Writing-on-Stone)

Áísínai’pi is the location of thousands of rock art images in Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park in southern Alberta. In the Blackfoot language Áísínai’pi means “it is pictured” or “it is written.” Painted and carved onto sandstone cliffs, most of the art was created by the Siksikaitsitapi (Blackfoot Nation) around 1050 BCE. Taken together, these images represent the largest concentration of Indigenous rock art in the North American plains. Áísínai’pi was designated a National Historic Site in 2004, and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2019.

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Bocabec Archaeological Site

The 1883 excavation of a portion of the Bocabec site by the Natural History Society of New Brunswick marked the beginning of systematic, scientific examinations of shell-bearing archaeological sites (see shell middens) in Canada.

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Burgess Shale

Burgess Shale is an area of layered rock featuring fossils from the middle of the Cambrian period (505–510 million years ago). In Canada, sites featuring Burgess Shale fossils are found in Yoho and Kootenay national parks. The name “Burgess” comes from Mount Burgess, a peak in Yoho National Park near where the original Burgess Shale site was discovered (the mountain is in turn named for Alexander Burgess, an early deputy minister of the Department of the Interior). Burgess Shale sites are the clearest record of Cambrian marine life because they contain rare fossils of soft-bodied organisms. The original Burgess Shale site is one of the reasons seven parks in the area were designated the Canadian Rocky Mountains UNESCO World Heritage site (the parks are Yoho, Jasper, Banff and Kootenay national parks, and Mount Robson, Mount Assiniboine and Hamber provincial parks).

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Ferryland Archaeological Site

The lowest levels have revealed campsites of the Beothuk, Newfoundland's now-extinct Native people. At the same levels evidence of European fishermen from Spain, Portugal, the Basque Provinces, Brittany and West Country England have been found.

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Fort Frontenac

Frontenac reoccupied the site, rebuilding the fort in 1695, and the post became known as Fort Frontenac. Reinforced by troops under François-Charles de Bourlamaque and later the Marquis de MONTCALM, it nevertheless fell to the British under John Bradstreet in August 1758.