Territorial | The Canadian Encyclopedia

Browse "Territorial"

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  • Article

    Discovery Day

    Discovery Day is a statutory holiday in Yukon commemorating the discovery of gold that set off the KLONDIKE GOLD RUSH and led to the formation of the territory.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/Categories_Placeholders/Dreamstime/dreamstimeextralarge_71875507130.jpg Discovery Day
  • Article

    Inuit High Arctic Relocations in Canada

    In 1953 and 1955, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, acting as representatives of the Department of Resources and Development, moved approximately 92 Inuit from Inukjuak, formerly called Port Harrison, in Northern Quebec, and Mittimatalik (Pond Inlet), in what is now Nunavut, to settle two locations on the High Arctic islands. It has been argued that the Government of Canada ordered the relocations to establish Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic, and proposed to Inuit the move, promising improved living conditions. The Inuit were assured plentiful wildlife, but soon discovered that they had been misled, and endured hardships. The effects have lingered for generations. The Inuit High Arctic relocations are often referred to as a “dark chapter” in Canadian history, and an example of how the federal government forced changes that fundamentally affected (and continue to affect) Inuit lives.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/media/72b158ab-21db-4572-9fec-db8a9548c9cf.jpg Inuit High Arctic Relocations in Canada
  • Article

    Yukon and Confederation

    Yukon entered Confederation in 1898, after a gold rush boom led Canada to create a second northern territory out of the Northwest Territories (NWT).

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/media/97973dc5-8c97-445f-8401-694689164bae.jpg Yukon and Confederation
  • Macleans

    Yukon Celebrates Gold Rush Centenary

    Madeleine Gould can often be seen on the streets of Dawson sporting a T-shirt that reads: "The Yukon: where men are men and women are pioneers."This article was originally published in Maclean's Magazine on August 19, 1996

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/Categories_Placeholders/Dreamstime/dreamstimeextralarge_71875507130.jpg Yukon Celebrates Gold Rush Centenary

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