Browse "Protests and Strikes"

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Estevan Coal Miners' Strike 1931

Coal miners at Bienfait, Saskatchewan, had joined the militant Mine Workers' Union of Canada in 1931. In September of that year they went on strike to win recognition of their union as a prelude to pressing demands for a restoration of wages cut by the local coal operators.

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Strikes and Lockouts

A strike is the withholding of labour by workers in order to obtain better wages or working conditions. A lockout is the opposite, being the temporary shutdown of a business by an employer to compel employees to accept certain conditions.

Macleans

US Strikes Back at Terrorists

Osama bin Laden is a slender man with a thick black beard, lightened by traces of grey, and soft eyes that give his face a melancholy air. He does not look dangerous, but according to American officials the Saudi Arabian exile, about 40, is the world's leading terrorist.

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Nègres blancs d'Amérique

Nègres blancs d'Amérique (1968), a Marxist analysis of Québec history and a program for the future, was written under the guise of autobiography by Pierre Vallières while he was confined in a Manhattan jail for FLQ activities.

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Bloody Sunday

Bloody Sunday was a violent confrontation between protesters and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Vancouver police in Vancouver on Sunday 19 June 1938.

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Vancouver Feature: Bloody Sunday

That stately building at the northwest corner of Hastings and Granville is known as the Sinclair Centre today. It houses federal offices, upscale clothing shops and a small mall. It was once Vancouver’s main Post Office, the site of “Bloody Sunday,” a violent Depression-era clash between police and unemployed workers.

Macleans

Chechen Revolt

As recently as late November, Russian Defence Minister Pavel Grachev boasted that it would take a single parachute regiment only two hours to subdue unrest in the breakaway southern republic of Chechnya.

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Cornwallis Statue

A statue of Edward Cornwallis, the colonial founder of Halifax, was erected in the city’s downtown in 1931 as a celebration of British settlement. It later became an object of controversy in the midst of a growing public debate about Cornwallis’s treatment of the Mi’kmaq people.

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Ipperwash Crisis

The Ipperwash Crisis took place in 1995 on land in and around Ontario’s Ipperwash Provincial Park, which was claimed by the Kettle and Stony Point First Nation. The underlying cause of the crisis was the appropriation of the Stoney Point Reserve in 1942 by the federal government for use as a military camp. After repeated requests for the land to be returned, members of the Stony Point First Nation occupied the camp in 1993 and in 1995. On 4 September 1995 protesters also occupied Ipperwash Provincial Park nearby. Tension between the protesters and the OPP increased, resulting in a confrontation on 6 September 1995 during which Dudley George, an Ojibwa protestor, was killed.

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Saskatchewan Doctors' Strike

The Saskatchewan Medical Care Insurance Bill was introduced in the Legislature 13 Oct 1961, and received royal assent 17 Nov 1961, after Woodrow S. LLOYD had replaced Douglas as premier. It was to come into force April 1, but this was amended, later, to 1 July 1962.

Macleans

Postal Strike Ends

At Golfinn International’s offices in Brampton, Ont., Dave Finn is busily scratching numbers on a notepad, trying to arrive at some reasonably accurate estimate of the damage.