Browse "Politicians"

Displaying 121-140 of 519 results
Macleans

Copps Defends Canadian Culture

She was at it again last week - talking tough, grabbing headlines, infuriating her detractors - and just plain worrying her allies. Less than a year after her public humiliation over the Goods and Services tax, Sheila COPPS was back as the perennial political bad girl.

Macleans

Copps Resigns

After two weeks of almost farcical behavior in Ottawa, most Canadians might well share those mixed emotions of relief, bewilderment and outright anger.

Article

D'Alton McCarthy

D'Alton McCarthy, lawyer, politician (b near Dublin, Ire 10 Oct 1836; d at Toronto 11 May 1898). He came to Canada with his parents in 1847, and was educated in Barrie, Canada West. He was called to the Bar of Upper Canada in 1858, and was elected to Parliament as a Conservative 1876.

Article

Dalton Camp

Camp continued to have a philosophical and policy influence, pushing the Tories to remain moderate. In 1986 he returned to public life and controversy as a consultant to the Mulroney government.

Macleans

Dalton Camp (Obituary)

Dalton CAMP's preferred seat at DJ Purdy's in Fredericton's Sheraton hotel was nestled in the back, off to one side on a raised platform and hidden in the shadows. From this well-chosen perch, Camp could see everyone in the bar.

Article

Daniel John O'Donoghue

Daniel John O'Donoghue, printer, trade union leader, politician (b at Lakes of Killarney, Ire 1844; d at Toronto 16 Jan 1907). "The father of the Canadian labor movement" began his apprenticeship as a printer in Ottawa

Article

Daniel Johnson, Jr.

Daniel Johnson, GOQ, business leader, politician and premier of Québec (born 24 December 1944 in Montréal, Québec). The Vice-President of Power Corporation of Canada from 1978 to 1981, Johnson also served as a member of Québec’s National Assembly for over 25 years. After the resignation of Premier Robert Bourassa, Johnson was elected leader of the Quebec Liberal Party, and on 11 January 1994, he became the 25th premier of Québec. However, he held on to this position for only eight months: in September 1994, the Liberals lost the Québec general election to the Parti Québécois. Johnson then served as leader of the Official Opposition for nearly three years, successfully leading the “No” camp in the Québec referendum campaign of 1995. He left politics in May 1998 and subsequently worked as a lawyer and as a negotiator for the government of Québec, while also sitting on several boards of directors.

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Daniel Johnson, Sr

Daniel Johnson, Québec premier and leader of the Union nationale (born 9 April 1915 in Sainte-Anne-de-Danville, Québec; died 26 September 1968 at the Manic-5 Dam, 214 km north of Baie-Comeau, Québec).

Article

Daniel Joseph Greene

Daniel Joseph Greene, lawyer, politician, Liberal prime minister of Nfld 1894-95 (b at St John's 1850; d there 12 Dec 1911). He became prime minister of Newfoundland 13 Dec 1894 in the wake of the legal and political turmoil surrounding the 1893 elections.

Article

Daniel Lionel Hanington

Daniel Lionel Hanington, lawyer, politician, premier of NB (b at Shediac, NB 27 June 1835; d at Dorchester, NB 5 May 1909). Clerk of circuits 1867-70 and a school trustee, he first sat as a Liberal-Conservative MLA for Westmorland in 1870.

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Daniel Paillé

Daniel Paillé, leader of the Bloc Québécois, federal and provincial politician, administrator, economist, university professor (born 1 April 1950 in Montréal); BAA (HEC Montréal) 1974, MSc (UQAM) 1976.

Article

Daniel Williams

In addition to practising law, Williams excelled at business. While attending Dalhousie's law school, he led a group of businesspeople to seek the first cable licence in Newfoundland and built Cable Atlantic into one of the largest communications companies in Atlantic Canada.

Article

Darrell Dexter

Dexter was educated at Dalhousie University in Halifax where he earned degrees in education and law. He also has a journalism degree from the University of King's College in Halifax.

Article

Dave Barrett

David Barrett, OC, OBC, 26th premier of British Columbia 1972–75, member of parliament 1988–93, MLA 1960–83, social worker (born 2 October 1930 in Vancouver, BC; died 2 February 2018 in Victoria, BC). Barrett led the first New Democratic Party government in British Columbia, a short-lived but prolific administration that passed more than 400 bills in three years. The Barrett government created the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia, the Agricultural Land Reserve and the province’s PharmaCare program. He was the first premier of Jewish heritage in Canada.

Article

David Alward

David Nathan Alward, civil servant, consultant, politician, diplomat, premier of New Brunswick 2010–14 (born 2 December 1959 in Beverly, Massachusetts). Alward was a federal civil servant, and a private consultant, before making the move to provincial politics in 1999. He was elected premier of New Brunswick on 27 September 2010 and governed for four years. After his defeat in 2014, he was named Canada’s consul general in Boston.

Article

David Croll

David Arnold Croll, lawyer, politician (b at Moscow, Russia 12 Mar 1900; d at Ottawa 10 June 1991). Elected a Liberal MLA in 1934, he became the first Jewish Cabinet minister but resigned in April 1937 over Premier HEPBURN's opposition to industrial unionism.

Article

David Crombie

David Crombie, teacher, politician (b at Toronto 24 Apr 1936). Educated at Western and U of T, he was appointed lecturer in political science and urban affairs at Ryerson Polytechnical Inst. From 1966 to 1971, Crombie was director of student affairs at Ryerson.

Macleans

David Dingwall (Profile)

Forget, for a moment, his reputation as a throwback to the old-style, intensely partisan Ottawa wheeler-dealers. At a little past 8 a.m. on a steel-grey morning, David Dingwall is trying to lighten up. It does not come easily.