Minorities in STEM | The Canadian Encyclopedia

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Displaying 1-15 of 15 results
  • Article

    Alfred Schmitz Shadd

    Alfred Schmitz Shadd, educator, physician, farmer, politician, pharmacist, editor, civic leader (born 1870 in Raleigh Township, Kent County, ON; died 1915 in Winnipeg, MB).

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/Categories_Placeholders/Dreamstime/dreamstimemaximum_98197126220.jpg Alfred Schmitz Shadd
  • Article

    Anderson Abbott

    Anderson Ruffin Abbott, doctor, surgeon (born 7 April 1837 in Toronto, Upper Canada; died 29 December 1913 in Toronto, ON). Abbott was the first Canadian-born Black person to graduate from medical school. He served the Union army as a civilian surgeon during the American Civil War.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/AndersonAbbott/AndersonAbott.JPG Anderson Abbott
  • Article

    Charles Lightfoot Roman

    Charles Lightfoot Roman, MD, CM, surgeon, author, researcher, lecturer (born 19 May 1889 in Port Elgin, ON; died 8 June 1961 in Valleyfield, QC). Charles Lightfoot Roman was one of the first Black Canadians to graduate from McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and became a recognized expert in industrial medicine. He was also one of the first Black Canadians to enlist for service in the First World War and was the only known Black person to serve with the Canadian General Hospital No. 3 (McGill). Lightfoot Roman was also likely the first Black Grand Master of a traditional Masonic lodge.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/home-page-images/lightfoot-roman-resized.jpg Charles Lightfoot Roman
  • Article

    Edith Monture

    Charlotte Edith Anderson Monture (often known simply as Edith Monture), Mohawk First World War veteran, registered nurse, (born 10 April 1890 on Six Nations reserve near Brantford, ON; died 3 April 1996 in Ohsweken, ON). Edith was the first Indigenous woman to become a registered nurse in Canada and to gain the right to vote in a Canadian federal election. She was also the first Indigenous woman from Canada to serve in the United States military. Edith broke barriers for Indigenous women in the armed forces and with regards to federal voting rights. A street (Edith Monture Avenue) and park (Edith Monture Park) are named after her in Brantford, Ontario.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/Twitter_Cards/Edith Monture 1.jpg Edith Monture
  • Article

    Dominique Gaspard

    Dominique François Gaspard, physician and community builder (born 22 December 1884 in New Orleans, Louisiana; died 6 February 1938 in Montreal, QC). Gaspard was a respected doctor and a trailblazer in Montreal’s Black district. After serving with distinction at a field hospital during the First World War, he devoted himself to medical practice in Montreal. He also worked to create social and intellectual outlets for Black men in the city. A bilingual Catholic, he was unique in the city’s early-20th-century anglophone Protestant Black community. His story speaks of a complexity of language, ethnicity and migration not often explored in narratives of Quebec’s English-speaking and Black communities.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/DominiqueGaspard/M_Dominique_Gaspard.jpeg Dominique Gaspard
  • Article

    Flordeliz Osler

    Flordeliz (a.k.a. Gigi) Osler (née Sharma), FRCSC, senator, physician and educator (born 1968 in Winnipeg, MB). Dr. Osler is an Otolaryngology – Head and Neck surgeon (ENT) surgeon and has practiced in Winnipeg since 1998. She was the past president of the Canadian Medical Association, making her the first female surgeon and the first woman of colour to assume the role. Osler was appointed to the Canadian Senate in 2022, making her the second senator of Filipino descent and the first woman of Filipino heritage to sit in the Senate.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/flordelizosler/fosler.jpg Flordeliz Osler
  • Article

    Gloria Baylis

    Gloria Leon Baylis (née Clarke), registered nurse, civil rights activist, founder and owner of Baylis Medical Company (born 29 June 1929 in Barbados, died 12 April 2017 in Montreal, QC). Baylis, a British-trained Caribbean migrant nurse was the key witness in Her Majesty the Queen, Complainant v. Hilton of Canada Ltd., Accused. (See also Caribbean Canadians.) On 2 September 1964, one day following the introduction of the Act Respecting Discrimination in Employment in Quebec, Baylis inquired about a permanent part-time nursing position at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel (QEH), which was operated by Hilton of Canada. Baylis was told that the position had already been filled. With the support of the Negro Citizenship Association (NCA), Baylis filed a complaint. On 4 October 1965, the court found that Hilton of Canada had violated the Act. For 11 years, Hilton of Canada appealed the ruling. On 19 January 1977, the Court of Appeal of Quebec upheld the initial conviction, a fine of $25 and related costs. This case is significant because it is the first time in Canadian history that an institution had been found guilty of racial discrimination in employment. (See also Prejudice and Discrimination in Canada.)

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/gloriabaylis/gloriabaylis.jpg Gloria Baylis
  • Article

    Irene Uchida

    Irene Ayako Uchida, OC, geneticist (born 8 April 1917 in Vancouver, BC; died 30 July 2013 in Toronto, ON). Dr. Uchida pioneered the field of cytogenetics in Canada, enabling early screening for chromosomal abnormalities (i.e., changes in chromosomes caused by genetic mutations). She discovered that women who receive X-rays during pregnancy have a higher chance of giving birth to a baby with Down syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities. She also discovered that the extra chromosome that causes Down syndrome may come from either parent, not only the mother. Click here for definitions of key terms used in this article.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/IreneUchida/uchida01.jpg Irene Uchida
  • Article

    Jean Cuthand Goodwill

    Jean Cuthand Goodwill, OC, nurse, public servant and Indigenous health and education advocate (born 14 August 1928 on the Poundmaker Cree Nation, SK; died 25 August 1997 in Regina, SK). Cuthand Goodwill was one of the first Indigenous registered nurses in Canada. In 1974, she cofounded Indian and Inuit Nurses of Canada (now known as the Canadian Indigenous Nurses Association). She was a lifelong organizer, writer and educator who promoted First Nations health and culture.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/single_use_images/Jean_Cuthand_Goodwill96.jpg Jean Cuthand Goodwill
  • Article

    Nadine Caron

    Nadine Rena Caron, OBC, surgeon, researcher, mentor, educator, patient advocate, community leader (born 1970 in Kamloops, BC). Nadine Caron was the first female First Nations student to graduate from the University of British Columbia Faculty of Medicine. She was also the first female First Nations general surgeon in Canada. For many years, Caron has highlighted the needs and voices of northern, rural and Indigenous populations in Canada.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/!feature-img-thumbnails/Nadine-Caron-tweet.jpg Nadine Caron
  • Article

    Nel Wieman

    Cornelia “Nel” Wieman, psychiatrist, Indigenous health advocate (born 1964 in Little Grand Rapids First Nation, MB). In 1998, Dr. Nel Wieman became the first female Indigenous psychiatrist in Canada. Wieman has spent over 20 years practising as a clinical psychiatrist. Additionally, she has been involved in research, medical education and with numerous health and medical associations. An Indigenous health advocate, Wieman works to address health issues faced by Indigenous people in Canada. She also works to end racism that Indigenous people and other visible minorities experience in the health care system and medical education.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/Categories_Placeholders/Dreamstime/dreamstimemaximum_98197126220.jpg Nel Wieman
  • Article

    Onye Nnorom

    Onyenyechukwu (Onye) Nnorom, family physician, specialist in public health and preventive medicine (born 27 February 1981 in Montreal, Quebec). Nnorom is the associate director of the residency program in public health and preventive medicine at the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health. She also leads the Black health curriculum at the university’s medical school. Her work addresses the health inequities that racialized and immigrant communities face.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/OnyeNnorom/Onye_Nnorom2.JPG Onye Nnorom
  • Article

    Oronhyatekha

    Oronhyatekha (pronounced O-RON-ya-day-ga, meaning "Burning Sky" or “Burning Cloud”), also known as Peter Martin, a Kanyen'kehà:ka (Mohawk) medical doctor and businessman (born 10 August 1841 on the Six Nations of the Grand River reserve near Brantford, Canada West [now Ontario]; died 3 March 1907 in Savannah, Georgia, US). In 1867, Oronhyatekha became the second Indigenous person in Canada to earn a medical degree. Passionate about Indigenous issues, he was elected to the Grand General Indian Council of Ontario and Quebec in 1872, where he fought against the restrictive measures of the Indian Act. Oronhyatekha was also a businessman and, in 1881, headed the Independent Order of Foresters.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/3-7 Grad photo.jpg Oronhyatekha
  • List

    Remarkable Indigenous Scientists and Researchers in Canada

    Indigenous scientists and researchers in Canada have helped to advance their respective professional fields by posing new questions to seek better ways of thinking, healing and understanding. Many of them have incorporated both Western and Indigenous perspectives and teachings into their important work. In many cases, these individuals have faced discrimination and systemic racism, and persevered. Many have the honour of being the first Indigenous person to graduate and practice in their professional field. This article lists some of the most accomplished Indigenous individuals in Canada who have excelled in the areas of science, research and related fields.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/NadineCaron/6477831161_afded91e4b_o.jpg Remarkable Indigenous Scientists and Researchers in Canada
  • Article

    William Peyton Hubbard

    William Peyton Hubbard, politician, inventor, baker, coachman (born 27 January 1842 in Toronto, ON; died 30 April 1935 in Toronto). Hubbard was Toronto’s first Black elected official, serving as alderman (1894–1903, 1913) and controller (1898–1908), and as acting mayor periodically. A democratic reformer, he campaigned to make the city’s powerful Board of Control an elected body. Hubbard was also a leading figure in the push for public ownership of hydroelectric power, contributing to the establishment of the Toronto Hydro-Electric System.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/media/a0e60ac0-06be-4d1b-8465-22ef1be9df80.jpg William Peyton Hubbard

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