Technology | The Canadian Encyclopedia

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Displaying 1-15 of 23 results
  • Article

    Beartrap (Helicopter Hauldown and Rapid Securing Device)

    The “beartrap” was a Canadian innovation designed in the 1960s to enable the safe operation of helicopters from destroyer-size ships. Known formally as the Helicopter Hauldown and Rapid Securing Device (HHRSD), it is now an integral part of all Canadian frigates. The beartrap revolutionized maritime helicopter operations and was adopted by other navies.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/SeaKing/SeaKing-Beartrap.jpg Beartrap (Helicopter Hauldown and Rapid Securing Device)
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    Bomarc Missile Crisis

    The CIM-10B Bomarc was the world’s first long-range, nuclear capable, ground-to-air anti-aircraft missile. Two squadrons of the missile were purchased and deployed by the Canadian government in 1958. This was part of Canada’s role during the Cold War to defend North America against an attack from the Soviet Union. Prime Minister John Diefenbaker’s refusal to equip the missiles with nuclear warheads led to a souring of Canada’s relationship with the United States, especially once the Cuban Missile Crisis brought the issue to the fore. The issue split Diefenbaker’s Cabinet and contributed to his party losing the 1963 election.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/media/fe8757c3-dd58-4969-92f1-316d16aa4e6c.jpg Bomarc Missile Crisis
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    Bren Gun Scandal

    When Canada prepared to produce Bren guns in the lead up to the Second World War, corruption allegations against the process were published. A royal commission was set up by the government but found no evidence of corruption.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/bren_gun_girl.jpg Bren Gun Scandal
  • Article

    Canada and Antisubmarine Warfare during the Cold War

    During the Cold War, the Canadian Navy played a crucial role in antisubmarine warfare (ASW), working closely with its allies to patrol and monitor the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans for Soviet submarine activity. Canada invested in new technology and continually modernized its fleet of ships and aircraft to better detect and counter Soviet submarines. It also operated strategic warning systems with its allies, particularly the United States. By the end of the Cold War, Canada had developed a very high reputation in the field.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/media/9f869e07-d522-4293-927d-787f3be65104.jpg Canada and Antisubmarine Warfare during the Cold War
  • Article

    Canada and SOSUS

    The Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) was a network of passive sonar stations established by the United States Navy (USN) in the early 1950s to “listen” for Soviet submarines. SOSUS was a core element of antisubmarine warfare (ASW) during the Cold War. It developed out of intense postwar oceanographic research into how sound is propagated under water. Given Canada’s shared responsibility for the defence of North America, the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was actively engaged in this research and mission and helped operate SOSUS. The mission was highly classified throughout the Cold War and only declassified in 1991. SOSUS became part of the Integrated Undersea Surveillance System (IUSS), a broader network of fixed and towed sensors that remains operational.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/ASW/Atlantic Canada w-markers_EN Final.jpg Canada and SOSUS
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    Canada and the Manhattan Project

    Canada helped develop the world’s first nuclear reactors and nuclear arms. During the Second World War, Canada participated in British research to create an atomic weapon. In 1943, the British nuclear weapons program merged with its American equivalent, the Manhattan Project. Canada’s main contribution was the Montreal Laboratory, which later became the Chalk River Laboratory. (See Nuclear Research Establishments). This Allied war effort produced the atomic bombs dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. It also led to the development of Canada’s nuclear energy industry. Click here for definitions of key terms used in this article.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/new_article_images/CanadaandtheManhattanProject/Chalk_River1947.jpg Canada and the Manhattan Project
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    Canada and Weapons of Mass Destruction

    Canada has a long, complicated history with weapons of mass destruction (WMDs). Canadian soldiers have been attacked with chemical weapons and have used them offensively. (See Canada and Gas Warfare.) Canada has researched chemical, biological and nuclear weapons; but also, ways to defend against them. Some chemical weapons were tested in Canada and against Canadians with long-term consequences. Canada played a crucial role in the development of nuclear weapons. (See Canada and the Manhattan Project.) The country employed nuclear weapons primarily as defensive weapons during the Cold War. Canada signed international documents limiting the use of these weapons. Canada no longer has weapons of mass destruction. However, Canada is a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and NORAD — alliances that employ nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/media/fe8757c3-dd58-4969-92f1-316d16aa4e6c.jpg Canada and Weapons of Mass Destruction
  • Article

    CANTASS

    The Canadian Towed Array Sonar System (CANTASS) has been used by Canadian ships since the late 1980s for long-range detection and identification of submarines. It is a passive system that “listens” but does not transmit any noise. The CANTASS uses a hydrophone array developed by the US Navy in conjunction with a powerful signal processor developed by Litton Systems Canada Ltd. The CANTASS has been fitted to the Annapolis-class destroyers, Halifax-class frigates, and the Oberon and Victoria-class submarines.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/CANTASS.jpg CANTASS
  • Article

    CH-124 Sea King

    The Sea King entered service with the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) in 1963 as an all-weather shipborne helicopter to provide close antisubmarine warfare (ASW) protection for ships at sea. By the time it was retired from service 55 years later, in 2018, it had undergone a variety of modifications and role-changes. Throughout, it maintained its well-earned reputation as the workhorse of the fleet. Sea King helicopters were a critical element in nearly every naval operation at home and abroad.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/SeaKing/SeaKings.jpg CH-124 Sea King
  • Article

    Chicoutimi Submarine Fire

    HMCS Chicoutimi is one of four used submarines Canada purchased from Britain in the late 1990s. In 2004, on its maiden voyage under command of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN), a fire caused severe damage, resulting in the death of one crew member. Eight others were injured. Chicoutimi would not sail again for almost 10 years.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/media/57f093ec-2cd7-48cf-bfbb-cdac1a0726ab.jpg Chicoutimi Submarine Fire
  • Article

    Corvette

    A corvette was a small, lightly armed Canadian warship used for anti-submarine warfare in the Second World War. With the convoys of the North Atlantic under siege by German U-Boats in the early years of the war, Canada needed to

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/media/c7f24305-f3af-40d0-b2e0-880f5a6e18b3.jpg Corvette
  • Article

    CS2F Grumman (de Havilland) Tracker

    The Tracker was a twin-engine fixed-wing aircraft acquired by the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) to be flown off aircraft carriers for antisubmarine warfare (ASW) as a replacement for the Grumman Avenger. Originally developed for the United States Navy (USN), a Canadian version was manufactured under licence by de Havilland Canada as the CS2F. After unification the plane was redesignated as the CP-121; the Trackers became shore-based aircraft after the aircraft carrier HMCS Bonaventure was decommissioned. The Trackers became fully operational in 1959 and were withdrawn from service in 1989.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/Tracker.jpg CS2F Grumman (de Havilland) Tracker
  • Article

    Dominion Arsenal

    Dominion Arsenal, the first government cartridge and shell factory and proofing facility, established 1882 at Québec to provide the Canadian Militia with ammunition.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/Categories_Placeholders/MemoryProject/Robert Charles Nelson_MemoryProject.jpg Dominion Arsenal
  • Article

    Hawker Hurricane

    The Hawker Hurricane was a combat aircraft of the 1930s and 1940s, designed by the British aircraft manufacturer Hawker Aircraft Ltd. The Hurricane was one of the principal combat aircraft that defended the United Kingdom during the Battle of Britain. This fighter plane played a pivotal role in the Second World War, primarily serving with the Royal Air Force, Royal Navy, Royal Canadian Air Force and Soviet Air Force. The Hurricane was mass-produced, with over 14,000 examples manufactured from 1937 to 1944. The Hurricane was produced in the United Kingdom and in Canada, with 1,451 examples built at the Canadian Car & Foundry plant, which was located in Fort William (now Thunder Bay), Ontario. Hurricane production in Canada lasted from 1938 to 1943 and was overseen by Elsie MacGill, the first woman in Canada to earn a master’s degree in aeronautical engineering. MacGill was popularly known as the “Queen of the Hurricanes” for overseeing the rapid production of the aircraft. At the height of production, the Canadian Car & Foundry plant produced 15 new aircraft each week. 

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/HawkerHurricane/Hurricane_a063534-v8.jpg Hawker Hurricane
  • Article

    Kangaroo APCs (Armoured Personnel Carriers)

    “Kangaroo” is the nickname given to a series of military transport vehicles (APCs) designed by the Canadian army in 1944, during the Battle of Normandy. (See Second World War.) It was a modified version of existing armoured vehicles such as the M7 (Priest) self-propelled gun, the Ram tank and the Sherman tank. Major components of these vehicles, such as their turret, were removed, thus allowing them to be used to transport infantry soldiers, safe from enemy fire.

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    https://d2ttikhf7xbzbs.cloudfront.net/media/media/a137744-v8.jpg Kangaroo APCs (Armoured Personnel Carriers)

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