Browse "Science & Technology"

Displaying 201-220 of 618 results
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Frank Harold Rigler

Frank Harold Rigler, biologist (b at London, Eng 9 June 1928; d at Montréal 26 June 1982). Educated at U of T, in 1957 he returned from postdoctoral study in England to the zoology department there.

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Frank Harris McLearn

Frank Harris McLearn, palaeontologist (b at Halifax 27 Feb 1885; d at Ottawa 7 Oct 1964). Educated at Dalhousie and Yale, he served on the GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA from 1913 to 1952.

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Frank Leith Skinner

Frank Leith Skinner, farmer, horticulturalist (b at Rosehearty, Scot 5 May 1882; d at Dropmore, Man 27 Aug 1967). After schooling in Aberdeen,Scotland, he immigrated to Dropmore in 1895 and ran a large grain and stock farm with his brother.

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Frank Russel Thurston

Frank Russel Thurston, aircraft engineer (b at Chicago, Ill 5 Dec 1914). Thurston's British parents took him at age one to England, where he worked from 1937 at the National Physical Laboratory.

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Frank Scott Hogg

Frank Scott Hogg, astrophysicist (b at Preston, Ont 26 July 1904; d at Richmond Hill, Ont 1 Jan 1951). In 1929 Hogg received the first doctorate in ASTRONOMY awarded by Harvard, where he pioneered in the spectrophotometry of stars and in the study of the spectra of comets.

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Franz Boas

Franz Boas, anthropologist, ethnologist, folklorist, linguist (born 9 July 1858 in Minden, Westphalia, Germany; died on 21 December 1942 in New York City, NY).

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Frederic Henry Sexton

Frederic Henry Sexton, educator, mining engineer (b at New Boston, NH 9 June 1879; d at Wolfville, NS 12 Jan 1955). After serving as an assistant in metallurgy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1901-02, he worked for the General Electric Company as a research chemist and metallurgist.

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Frédéric Pelletier

Frédéric ('Fred') Pelletier (Peltier). Choirmaster, critic, teacher, composer, physician, b Montreal 1 May 1870, d there 30 May 1944; MD (Montreal) 1895, honorary D MUS (Montreal) 1937.

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Frederic William Cumberland

Frederic William Cumberland, engineer and architect, railway manager and legislator (b at London, Eng 10 April 1820; d at Toronto 5 August 1881). Known in his own day as a railway manager and politician, today he is celebrated as one of Toronto's leading 19th-century architects.

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Frederick Montizambert

Frederick Montizambert, physician, public-health official (b at Québec, Canada E 3 Feb 1843; d at Ottawa 2 Nov 1929). Montizambert practised in Québec before entering the Canadian public-health service in 1866.

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Frederick Newton Gisborne

Frederick Newton Gisborne, telegraph engineer (b at Broughton, Eng 8 Mar 1824; d at Ottawa 30 Aug 1892). At the age of 32, Gisborne completed the first submarine telegraph line in North America, joining Newfoundland across the Cabot Strait with the mainland.

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Frederick Pursh

Frederick Pursh, botanist (b Friedrich Traugott Pursch in Grossenhain, Saxony 4 Feb 1774; d at Montréal 11 July 1820). At age 25 Pursh left Dresden to try his luck in the New World.

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Frederick Ronald Hayes

Frederick Ronald Hayes, biologist, science administrator (b at Parrsboro, NS 29 Apr 1904; d at Halifax 6 Sept 1982). As chairman of the FISHERIES RESEARCH BOARD 1964-69, Hayes guided its expansion and increased links with the universities through grants and research collaboration.

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Frederick Walker Baldwin

Frederick Walker Baldwin, "Casey," aviator, inventor (b at Toronto 2 Jan 1882; d at Beinn Bhreagh, NS 7 Aug 1948). He completed engineering studies at University of Toronto in 1906. In 1907 he became a founding member

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Frederick William Beechey

Frederick William Beechey, naval officer, artist, explorer (b at London, Eng 17 Feb 1796; d there 29 Nov 1856). Beechey joined the British navy at the age of 10, and saw action at the Battle of New Orleans in 1815.

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Gaspard-Joseph Chaussegros de Léry

Gaspard-Joseph Chaussegros de Léry, military engineer (born 3 October 1682 in Toulon, France; died 23 March 1756 in Quebec City, QC). Chaussegros de Léry contributed to the development of New France by fortifying the colony’s towns, namely Quebec and Montreal. His relief maps of Quebec and Montreal are still regarded as accurate models of these cities. Some consider Chaussegros de Léry the father of the first truly Canadian architecture. (See also Architectural History: The French Colonial Regime.)