Browse "Korean War"

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Article

Canadian Women in the Cold War Navy

Women served in the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) throughout the Cold War. Known for much of this period as “Wrens,” they played an important role in RCN missions and operations, including antisubmarine warfare. In 1951, the Canadian Naval Reserve began recruiting women into the service. Women could join the regular navy beginning in 1955; the RCN was the first Commonwealth navy to integrate women into the permanent force. For many years, Wrens served in shore-based branches and trades, including stores, communications, intelligence, submarine detection and in the medical services. By the end of the Cold War, all naval trades and occupations, except submarine service, were open to women. (See also Canada and the Cold War; Women in the Military.)

Article

Léo Major

Léo Major, DCM and Bar, soldier and war hero (born 23 January 1921 in New Bedford, Massachusetts, died 12 October 2008 in Montreal, QC). Major was a veteran of the Second World War and the Korean War. He is the only Canadian to be awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM) for two separate wars.

Memory Project Archive

Adrien Brisson (Primary Source)

Mr. Adrien Brisson is a Korean War veteran who served with the 2nd Battalion of Le Royal 22e Régiment from August 1950 until his discharged in June of 1952. He fought at the Battle of Hill 355 in November 1951 as a Bren Machine Gunner with B Coy.Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Memory Project Archive

Aimé Mayer (Primary Source)

Aimé Mayer served in the reconnaissance group during the Korean War. Read and listen to Aimé Mayer’s testimony below.Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Memory Project Archive

Aimé Michaud (Primary Source)

Aimé Michaud served in the army during the Korean War. Read and listen to Aimé Michaud’s testimony below.Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.Content warning: This article contains content which some may find offensive or disturbing. 

Memory Project Archive

Albert Gagnon (Primary Source)

Albert Gagnon served in the army during the Korean War. Read and listen to Albert Gagnon’s testimony below. Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Memory Project Archive

Albert Hugh Al or Abby McBride (Primary Source)

Albert Hugh Al McBride served in the army during the Korean War. Read and listen to Albert McBride’s testimony below. Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Memory Project Archive

Alex Sim

During the Korean War, Alex Sim served as platoon sergeant, reconnaissance platoon, 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Regiment.Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada. 

Memory Project Archive

André Therrien

André Therrien received his officer's commission with Le Régiment de Maisonneuve in 1947. At the beginning of the Korean War, he was transferred to the Regular Force as a lieutenant at Valcartier, Quebec and deployed overseas with 2nd Battalion, Le Royal 22e Régiment. In Korea, he led a platoon in a successful assault as part of Operation MINDEN in September 1951, for which he was awarded the Military Cross (MC), the third highest military decoration for officers. He was military attaché at the Embassy of Canada in Brussels and was posted to Belgium and Luxembourg (1973-1976). He retired from the Canadian Forces in 1981.Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada. 

Memory Project Archive

Andrew Andy Barber

Andy Barber served in 1954-1955 on the HMCS Haida, a Royal Canadian Navy Tribal-class destroyer. He discusses life while patrolling the Korean coasts and incidents that occurred while at sea.Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada. 

Memory Project Archive

Andrew Lariviere

Andrew Lariviere was in the army during the Korean War. Read and listen to Andrew Lariviere’s testimony below.  Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada. 

Memory Project Archive

Andrew Moffat

Lieutenant-Colonel (ret’d) Andrew Moffat was with the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery during the Korean War. He served as an intelligence officer and as a forward observation officer. He provides insights into those roles, while explaining how artillery support was provided for Canadian forces at the front in Korea.Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.