Browse "Lakes & Reservoirs"

Displaying 21-40 of 64 results
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Lac Guillaume-Delisle

Lac Guillaume-Delisle, 712 km2, is a large, triangular, saltwater lake in northern Québec, connected to the eastern shore of Hudson Bay by Le Goulet, a 5 km long narrow channel.

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Lac la Martre

Lac la Martre, 1777 km2, elev 265 m, max length 76 km, is located in the Northwest Territories, 50 km west of Behchokò and 150 km northwest of Yellowknife, and 346 km south of the Arctic Circle. The settlement of WHATÌ is located at the southeastern corner of the lake.

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Lac La Ronge

Lac La Ronge, 1414 km2, elevation 364 m, is located in the rugged, sparsely populated Canadian Shield country of central Saskatchewan, 235 km north of Prince Albert. About 58 km long and studded with many islands, it drains northeast via the Rapid River into the Churchill River.

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Lac Mégantic (lake)

Lac Mégantic, 26 km2, elev 395 m, 75 m deep, is located in a depression of the Appalachians in southern Québec, 6 km from the US border. LAC-MÉGANTIC, the only town of the region, is located at its outlet, which is the source of the Rivière CHAUDIÈRE.

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Lac Mistassini

Lac Mistassini, 2335 km2, elevation 372 m, max length 161 km and width 19 km, is located in central Québec, 360 km east of JAMES BAY and 220 km northwest of Lac SAINT-JEAN.

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Lac Saint-Jean

The Kakouchaks, the local population of Innu, began trading with the Europeans at TADOUSSAC in the 16th century. Later, Lac Saint-Jean was made part of the King's Domain (1674), land reserved for trapping and farmed out to interested parties; a first trading post was built at Métabetchouane in 1676.

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Lac Seul

Lac Seul, 1658 km2, elev 357 m, 55 m deep, located in northwestern Ontario, 50 km N of Dryden, drains W via the English and Winnipeg rivers to Lk Winnipeg.

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Lac Shawinigan

Shawinigan, Lac, 3.2 km2, 6.3 km long, 80 m deep, lies on Québec's Laurentian Plateau, 70 km north of Lac Saint-Pierre on the St Lawrence River. This lake of glacial gouging is prolonged to the east by Petit Lac Shawinigan, Lac Bernard and Lac en Croix.

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Lake Abitibi

Lake Abitibi, 932 km2, elev 265 m, straddles the Québec-Ontario border about 280 km south of James Bay.

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Lake Agassiz

Lake Agassiz was the largest glacial lake in North America. It was formed 11 500 years ago in front of the northeastwardly retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet, which acted as a dam.

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Lake Athabasca

Lake Athabasca is located in northeastern Alberta and northwestern Saskatchewan, at the edge of the Precambrian Shield. With an area of 7,935 km2 and a 2,140 km shoreline, it is the eighth-largest lake in Canada.

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Lake Champlain

Lake Champlain (or Lac Champlain), 1269 km2, lies mostly in the United States (New York and Vermont); only the northernmost tip lies in Canada. The lake is long (201 km) and narrow (0.8 to 23 km wide) and interspersed with numerous islands.

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Lake Diefenbaker

Lake Diefenbaker is a reservoir lake south of Saskatoon, Sask. It was formed by the construction of 2 dams that created a widening in the South SASKATCHEWAN RIVER as part of the South Saskatchewan River Development Project, inaugurated in 1958.

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Lake Erie

The lake drainage basin measures 58 800 km2 in area, and is home to over 15 million people in Canada and the US, making it the most densely populated of all the Great Lakes basins.

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Lake Huron

Air masses from the Arctic, Pacific and Atlantic oceans and the Gulf of Mexico converge on the lake, which therefore experiences 4 distinct seasonal patterns and extremes of weather conditions.

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Lake Louise

Lake Louise, 2.4 km long, elevation 1731 m, is located in Banff National Park in southwestern Alberta. Lake Louise's outlet is a creek flowing into the Bow River.

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Lake Manitoba

Lake Manitoba, 4624 km2, elev 248 m, is one of 3 large lakes occupying the southern half of Manitoba. A narrow, irregular lake, about 200 km long with marshy shores, it is fed mainly from Lake WINNIPEGOSIS, which lies to the northwest, and drains northeast via the Dauphin River to Lake WINNIPEG.

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Lake Nipigon

Later posts were established by the NWC and HBC, but none grew into major settlements. With its limited population, unspoiled environment and abundant fish and wildlife, the area is ideal for outdoor recreation.